EN3263: Singapore Literature in Context

Module code & title: EN3263: Singapore Literature in Context

Grading:

25% close reading assignment
35% research essay
15% book review
15% 5 minute presentation on a selected singapore literature text from 2012-2017
10% class participation (yes he actually likes it a lot a lot when people talk, he asks questions)

Lecturer: Dr Philip J Holden

He’s a really kind professor, some have described him as a kind uncle. He’s the most conscientious professor in the literature department I’ve ever met besides Dr Yeoh. He creates a lesson plan on IVLE, linking all worksheets/slides/secondary readings and everything really, it’s quite astounding considering most professors don’t actually do that.

What it’s about: It’s a singapore literature module. You study Alfian Sa’at and other related authors, mainly from the Anthology of Singapore literature. You go through the history of Singapore and some of the controversial times/texts that our nation has seen. it opens your eyes to things in literature you haven’t seen before, and the discussions are enlightening.

Assignment workload: Reading of primary texts and weekly forum posts. Weekly forum posts are how he notes and starts class participation because he discusses the opinions that you posited on the forum posts. Anyway forum postings are good because you have to read the texts to post on the forum.

Thoughts about the tutor: –

Project workload & question/theme –

Readings: See above

Exam (briefly format and difficulty): It’s a lot of work though, many small components. But manageable.

Recommended if…You’re interesting in singlit. You should check it out.

Rating (in terms of how much you enjoyed it) – 3.5/5

 

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EN2201: Backgrounds to Literature

Taken in AY16/17 Sem 2, (posting this late, but realised it was worth writing!)

Module code & title: EN2201: Backgrounds to Literature

Grading:

70% CA – made up of:
1. Midterm essay (20%)
2. Final essay (30%)
3. Class Participation (20%)
30% final exam (YES this module has finals!)

Lecturer: Dr Gilbert Yeoh (he’s the best!!)

Dr Yeoh gives you everything. Like he prints a course package for you and he has soooo many slides because every possible thing he wants you to learn for the module is smacked on it. His lectures are funny, sometimes information overload. The seminar is made up of a lecture for an hour and a half then a discussion segment. There’s a break in between those segments. He is open to controversial ideas and opinions. He wants originality in your essays which to be very honest can be tough given that he spoon feeds almost everything. But it is very interesting and he’s super kind and generous to always help/open for consults so please go for consults.

What it’s about: It’s a classics module. You study Homer’s Odyssey, Sophocles’ Oedipus and the books of Genesis and John from the Bible. Reason for these texts being that they are argued to be the earliest written texts in Western civilization and their themes are foundational for the writing and creation of Western literature. (therefore the title of the mod)

Assignment workload: READINGS. Many readings for a 2k module, but it is doable. Speak up in lectures, and you’ll do okay. Go through the tutorial question list at least, skim through it once before you come into the seminar.

Thoughts about the tutor: –

Project workload & question/theme –

Readings: See above

Exam (briefly format and difficulty): It’s an interesting paper, he’s not so much looking for originality as much as argument and your opinion so just state your opinion. Most people pick their favourite text and write on it.

Recommended if…You love Dr Yeoh (!!woo!!)

Rating (in terms of how much you enjoyed it) – 5/5

 

EN2275: Writing About Literature

Module code & title: EN2275

Grading: FULLY CA
10% class part,
20% Summary
25% Essay 1
25% Essay 2
10% Final Portfolio/Reflection

Lecturer & tutor:
Dr Aparna Shukla

Dr Shukla created this module newly, hence being the first iteration a lot of things would be new and in incipient stages. Lectures could be draggy until you realise what the focus of the module is and that actually lectures are not as good as tutorials. Tutorials are more helpful because mostly students take this module with the idea that they want to improve on their writing and generally people improve in smaller groups because there’s more attention on the individual student so that’s the thing about her tutorials, they’re small and super helpful.

What it’s about: how to write. properly. You start with learning summaries and interpretation skills which seem lame until you realise you cannot actually do it properly. Then you learn how to think and write a clear proper introduction and you move on to the essay itself… She uses the topic of trauma to give us a platform to write.

Assignment workload: Not much work. One reading can be covered over the first 6 weeks. Then the second half is a film/text. There are secondary readings but they are as per needed (if you write the essay then you read that reading)

Thoughts about the tutor: –

Project workload & question/theme –

Readings: Barely any, really.

Exam (briefly format and difficulty): No exams. 3 assignments through the semester, all of which you can bring in and consult her. And you should. It’ll help tremendously

Recommended if…you are a literature major who needs to learn how to write properly.l

Rating (in terms of how much you enjoyed it) – 4/5

Expected grade: A-

Actual grade

I used to be afraid (now not so much) // My leadership journey in NUS so far

DISCLAIMER: This post is gonna be a reflection post on my leadership journey in NUS. It contains my experiences and mine only (it does not apply to everyone), neither is it a one size fits all kind of thing. Feel free to take the advice, but also know that it is from MY perspective.


I think I used to be afraid of position names. I still am, except, this time it comes with a sliver of courage, which is something experience (bad and good) gave me. I was afraid of position names because I used to think that it was a bad thing if I could be in a position and not have the ability to fulfil my role which would lead to letting people down. Slowly, as I took different positions, I realised that I not only was able to lead well in that role (thank you God!!) but I also surpassed my expectations in terms of what I was capable of. This is not to say that I didn’t fail. I freaked out countless times, especially with a fear of public speaking, I didn’t know how to phrase my words properly (I still have trouble with that), in that I do not know how to be diplomatic. I’m more of a get-the-job-done person, many times without considering the interpersonal relationships and dynamics of people that are intricately linked to the task at hand. Anyway, here’s a few lessons I learnt after taking on about 5-6 different leadership positions in Uni, from Subcomms to Secretary, I’ve kinda tried most stuff, including currently being the Project Director for Guardians.

  1. School is a safer and friendlier place to learn from your mistakes. I’ve always been very thankful for school. It’s the one place where you can screw up and have people actually teach you and tell you what went wrong without them having your head chopped after that. In the corporate world I’m sure that’s not just not the case, but also out there if you made a mistake, it could potentially cost like thousands or millions of dollars for the company. I guess I’m always thankful for mentors, seniors, people who give you advice especially with regards to leadership positions. I’m not saying you cannot get this out there in the working world, it is just that in school, it’s different, you can actually ask questions for things you don’t know with less politics, less people breathing down your neck, etc. It’s kinder, friendlier, of course this is not to say there aren’t politics, but, if you really hate it, you’re also free to leave an organization. I suppose it isn’t that simple to walk away from a job.
  2. Do things well in your term, give your best, LEAVE A LEGACY. You’re not gonna be serving in that term forever, pass on things well, don’t do a slipshod job. I get super annoyed every time people pass on stuff (whether materials, or their legacies) and it’s like crappy. Like a crappy event that was previously hosted, or a crappy attitude or whatever. Don’t do it halfheartedly, I mean you got elected/chosen/selected/whatever into that position because you said you wanted to do it, so do it, dammit. Do it well, don’t leave crap for people to pick up. Having said that, bad experience has also taught me that people will always leave their crap for you to pick up, then the onus is on you to create a good event, run a position well, do things to the best of your ability, then you (and your exco if you have one) will do well. I learnt this especially from my time in ODAC, the seniors did well, so well and there was so much that was learnt from them. My batch that served were tremendously talented as well as responsible and hardworking, they toiled super hard to create great events. I learnt much with them because I watched how they worked intelligently and honestly. So when we passed on everything to the next batch, they had much greatness to inherit (lol), no seriously, they inherited great things and we also made sure we attempted to select the best people so we could carry these things on. I’m still proud of them (hehe).
  3. Good communication is key. Be honest, yet tactful. I am still learning this. Two years, about 6-7 CCAs and I still have not mastered this art, yet I can say I have improved much. Communication breakdown tends to lead to failure. It seems very cliche to say this but seriously, a dearth of communication tends to lead to shit happening everywhere. Internal politics will result in external events failing, one cell believes they worked harder than the other cell, this results in crappy feelings and angst against another party, then leading to vendettas of people against other people, blah blah blah… I’ve gone through that and it wasn’t a pretty sight. So communicate, learn to air your feelings, sometimes it will be more painful than other times, especially if you’re on the side of blame, but I can say that it is better to deal with people telling you your mistakes in a straightforward and direct way than it is to deal with bitter feelings and unspoken tensions and fake diplomacy. Good communication also ensures people in the team know what is going on, they feel involved, not left out, and everyone wants to feel involved and part of the event/team.
  4. You need a good combination of diplomacy and efficiency. Usually you do this by combining the P/VP personalities, or at least in the Pres cell you should have a combination of both kinds. This means that you have to have task-oriented and people-oriented personalities. Too much of one either results in unhappy people while the job may be done, or happy people and no job done, or slow job done. Diplomacy is super important, you need someone who can talk to people, persuade, convince, and also elicit actions and responses from people, whether your fellow exco, participants, etc. Some people have both efficiency and diplomacy, like an individual I worked with and am friends with for two years. But others like me do not, I can really work but I don’t have as much skill/tactfulness in speaking to people. Have both personalities and those who lack part of the duo also sometimes do learn slowly. Having said that, it is not that these are the only two things needed in good leadership, but they are extremely crucial. Other factors however, do count.
  5. Learn the ropes of different roles in organizational stuff in NUS. Proposals, Admin, how to deal with OSA, how to book venues, how to email people using PDPA guidelines, how to handle addresses/a torrent of them especially in large(r) events, how to deal with manpower issues, logistics, catering services, vendors, marketing. Everyone of these usually is a different cell in a committee but it is good to get to know them. I think it is good that people try different things to learn. I joined logistics, admin, manpower, publicity, before I applied for VP role in a club. I think that’s very useful because it gives you finally a bird’s eye view over situations and in events you know where to get what done and how to get it done. It seems like a trivial job to print posters but there are things to learn there too. Ask questions, try different roles and learn from those who are in it already, it doesn’t hurt to learn more things and be able to help others who may suffer from the same problems in future. Also, knowing different cells and their roles actually makes you very marketable, it makes people want you because you know stuff and you can do stuff and even if you’re not doing it directly, they know you will be an asset to the club. Never hurts to be needed/wanted.
  6. Lastly, learn to deal with higher ups – whether OSA, CCA advisors, or even if you’re in a Subcomm, learn to deal with your pres cell. You need to learn to work under authority and with authority. Instead of feeling inferior, know your position and then excel in it, sometimes exceed expectations (haha). Make yourself an active and integral part of whatever you’re in. Learn to deal with higher-ups by befriending them and working with them, if you have issues with them, try and voice it out nicely (and if it doesn’t work, find another way out or ask for help/alternative suggestions). The higher-ups usually don’t cause trouble unless you do.

    Anyway, thanks for reading, and feel free to drop your comments/disagree. 🙂

EN3221: The English Renaissance

Taken in:
AY16/17 Semester 2

Lecturer:
Dr Walter Lim

What the module is about, briefly:
Renaissance texts and concerns, covering a selection of plays and prose. This module familiarizes one with the historical and political context of the Renaissance and allows you to read the texts in the light of that context. Themes that are covered are like: Protestantism vs Catholicism, authority, The Great Chain of Being, traditional gender roles, man’s relationship to God, sexual desire and prohibitions, etc

Texts:
William Shakespeare’s Sonnets
Andrew Marvell’s Sonnets
Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus
Ben Jonson’s Volpone
John Milton’s Poetry
John Donne’s Devotional Lyrics and Love Poetry

Workload:
Readings, well mainly the text, if you can even keep up with that. There’s secondary readings that are non-compulsory, however, there are select authors which he often refers to which would be good if you know about. My biggest tip for dealing with this module is that – there is much breadth covered, but the amount of depth which you would want to go into is really up to you, and I chose a certain topic and then researched more on it, so it is really up to you. I did so, so that I would get a chance to explore one topic I really liked and go deep into it. (Also it means you’d have less worries about listening to the rest of the topics/authors).

Format of assessment:

1 short midterm essay 15% (600-800 words)
1 Review Essay 15% (review of an article, pick 1 of 4, some can be longer than others, but pick it based on your interest, each one is a different topic, 500-600 words)
1 Final Essay 40% (includes annotated Biblio and abstract)
Forum Participation 10%
Tutorial Presentation & Class discussion 15% (1 Project Presentation (!!) tutorials will be listening to different presentation, my advice is to sign up super early and get it done/out of the way asap)

(yeah so it’s a somewhat exhausting workload, but it’s kinda spaced out nicely so no last min work)

Project/Presentation:
You’ll be presenting on a particular text, there will be guiding question(s) given at the start of the sem/first tutorial. You’d probably have to come up with a 1/2 an hour presentation, and anything you do not know, learn to direct it to the floor, deflect questions like a boss (no, seriously, if you do not know something, ask the class for answers, people should talk, and if they don’t, Dr. Lim will cover it well. 

Lecturer/Tutor
Some people say this prof has a kinda like ‘one track mind’ and other things, this is not to say it is a bad thing, neither is it altogether a good thing. (Make your own judgments). I really enjoyed the module under him and that’s probably because I got his style. Some people may not and that is fine. His lectures to me are engaging and interesting. He does give lecture notes/slides also so if you’re for any reason unable to make it, it is not too bad. He’s approachable and friendly toward any consultation requests too. 🙂

Exam difficulty:
You pick your own final essay question/there’s a list of like recommended stuff, but you’re free to think of your own topic, just clear it with him.
Article review is not very hard, neither is the presentation etc. Very manageable module.

Recommended:
Yes, it is an essential module that gives foundational understanding for other modules that may have topics that are influenced by Renaissance works.

Overall rating (/10):
8/10

EN3242: History of Film

Taken in:
AY16/17 Semester 2

Lecturer:
A/P Valerie Wee
Tutor: Phoebe Pua

What the module is about, briefly:
History of film. Isn’t it self-explanatory? HAHA. A brief coverage (not in depth) about the different historical backgrounds of film in America, Japan, Russia, Germany, France, Italy. You can choose to focus on any of them later.

Texts:
FILMS* (Ranging from SILENT FILMS to Sound ones),
1. A Trip to the Moon
2. Broken Blossoms
3. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari
4. Battleship Potempkin
5. Bringing Up Baby
6. The Rules of the Game
7. Sunset Boulevard
8. The Bicycle Thief
9. The 400 Blows
10. Late Spring
11. The Graduate (I think this was changed, I’m not sure, don’t remember)

Workload:
HAHA. I would say it is tiring but interesting. The most tiring part is perhaps keeping up with the movies, because you’ll need to watch them so you can talk in tutorial, and also, the research part for the group/pair report concerning the various topics (pick one). I did Russian cinema: Constructivism, so that was pretty interesting, though energy-sapping. Final essay requires more in depth thought and research, but if you pick something you like, it isn’t too bad 🙂 I did Doctor Strange (and linked it to Film Noir) and I did pretty okay! (YAY).

Format of assessment:
100% CA:
1. Tutorial participation (20%)
2. Tutorial facilitation (10%)
3. Group Written Report (20%)
4. Research paper – Annotated Biblio (10%), Abstract (10%), Essay (30%)

Project/Presentation:
Presentation centers on the movie of your choice, you have to engage the class in a discussion concerning the movie for that week, you can choose to break the class into groups to discuss various topics in the movie. There are guiding questions so you do not have to worry. The group written report will probably be linked to the movie of your choice (or it may not be, as well). 

Comments on lecturer:
Here is where I shall sing the praises of Prof Wee and my tutor.
Prof Wee: she’s extremely approachable and helpful with the topics you choose to write on, comments on essays and reports are constructive. Her lectures are engaging and interesting. And she’s super nice (I can’t even)
Phoebe: She’s kinda like Prof Wee, and since I got her in tutorial, I’ll say she’s very insightful and proffers useful comments and also does this little thing where she contextualises every national cinema and gives you important dates you should know about each cinema. She does this every week. Also, she’s very good with time management so we always end on time and yet there’s a very fruitful discussion, so I appreciate that immensely.

Exam difficulty:
Just workload, no major exams.
It’s spaced out through the semester so requires a fair but of stamina and much less space for last minute work.

Recommended:
YES. If you like film, yes. If you don’t, (like me), you can still listen it is worth listening to, and then pick a topic you like and work on it. I did film noir and Doctor Strange because I happened to really like both. I wanted to do Marvel but I didn’t in the end because there was just a better option (and I changed my topic like last minute after I finished full annotated biblio and abstract and all because I just felt like it, and Prof Wee let me do it, she talked me through changing the topic and everything worked out). So I hope I have successfully convinced you to do it!!!!!!!!

Overall rating (/10):
8/10

How not to be always ‘broke’

This is written for broke college students. By broke, I mean 2.50 in your bank account kind of broke. That’s how bad it gets. One uber ride here ’cause you’re late and another expensive 10 bucks meal there and before you know it, you’re utterly down to your last dollar.

This cycle repeats every month until you get paid perhaps if you’re working part time or like a few hours a week which I’m sure is what a lot of us do. Wherever the money comes from, it doesn’t matter. What matters is that it’s kinda gone before we know it. Social media is filled with advertisements and we fall for it. It doesn’t help that Google or the bots that run the internet track what we see and later you see that Zalora dress turn up as an ad on your Facebook sidebar. It sucks.

Anyway so this is how I saved money because well, I needed to plan for an event and more importantly, I was really sick of being broke

  1. Firstly, make your own food. And if you can’t cook then get what you like to eat that’s really easily prepared. Well,  it depends on what you like to eat. You could boil potatoes, celery and chicken overnight in a slow cooker for stew which costs about $5 for everything. I’m good with oats. I grabbed a 1kg bag of rolled oats and another bag of oatmeal and dunked them both in a box, mixed them. I soaked a portion overnight every night and ate it with milk and whatever fruits I could find in the fridge. That and coffee, made breakfast. It lasted me till at least 1 to 2pm. Then I got a meal at school, about 4 bucks maximum. And then the next meal was dinner which I forced myself to go home for. So I spend 4 bucks a day on food outside. That’s a change from spending 10 bucks a day. That’s 6 dollars difference, in a week, that’s 42 bucks.

    (Other ideas include: boiled eggs (my friend says you can chill them overnight), macaroni and minced chicken with veg and fishball, put chicken stock for the soup, pasta salad, fried rice – where you empty the contents of your fridge’s leftovers into the frying pan, sandwiches – all sorts of them).

  1. I started going home earlier. Going home late means sleeping later and waking later. University for me doesn’t start till 10, so of course I don’t get up at 6. I didn’t have to at least. But I realised as above mentioned, that I saved cost on one meal by having dinner at home. That meant I was home by 8pm. After dinner, was work until about 11.30 and I went to bed earlier, and consequently woke up at 7 instead of the usual 8.30. That’s a whole hour and a half more to chill, make breakfast, shower, prep to go to school, check emails, roll around a bit more in bed if needed etc. That’s an hour an a half of money. Look, if you wake up quick and rush, you lose the chance to have breakfast and then you’re starving but you have to go to class so you dash out to class, grab something small along the way which doesn’t exactly fill you but it’s meant to last till lunch – waffles and a drink that’s about 2.50, repeat this 4 times and week and that’s 10 bucks extra. You saved 10 bucks a week by having breakfast at home. It’s a lifestyle thing.
  1. I stopped spending on small stuff. It looks small, it’s less than 10 bucks. But buy 10 $8 items and that’s $80 bucks, repeat that for 4 months and that’s $320 that could have been saved. I stopped buying small stuff I didn’t need and only got them cause they looked cute. That habit was bad and it was one of the biggest reasons I kept blowing money everywhere unnecessarily..
  2. Stop going to bazaars if you know you’re gonna spend. Don’t go. Don’t browse cause you’re sure to grab stuff. Unless your self control is amazing. Mine’s definitely not. Stay off Carousell, Zalora, Asos, Aliexpress, Ebay, Amazon and Taobao/Ezbuy…
  3. If transport is a big issue in spending try getting concession passes. It’s 85 for uni students for a month of unlimited tapping (bus and train). Applying for a concession cards costs $23 and can be done at selected Transitlink offices!
  1. Have a coin box. It’s so primary school but it’s not a bad idea. Dump your coins in at the end of the day. It clears your wallet and makes your future self few dollars richer. Any savings program can’t be a bad thing. If you have many two dollar notes, put one inside. You’ll thank yourself later. I did that for a year. I got 100 bucks out of it.

 

That’s about all. Start small. It actually feels really nice seeing more money in your bank as you go along.

A Christian student in college

 

Most people have their timetables empty when they come into university. Slowly with every fair that they go to, whether it is faculty events fairs, CCA fairs, sports fairs, etc., it starts filling up, first the weeknights, then the Saturdays and Sundays (perhaps) and then the slots where they don’t have lectures, and it gets more and more. Not everyone does this, but mostly, people prioritize academics, social life, and some, sleep. As a Christian student, we all know in the back of our minds that we come to college, wanting to first pull ourselves through as well as bring Christ to those around us, (some of us of course have this conviction deeper than others).

So we enter school (me included) and I started out Year 1 with the vision for myself that I would enjoy everything I do and do it all to the glory of God, for Him, not for myself. Sooner or later, this changed as I found that other things seemed to have taken over the  top of the priority list, my next social gathering beckoned while church events and quiet time took a backseat. At first my conscience was slightly disturbed, but I suppressed it, telling myself I would get my priorities in order when it was possible and that now was not the time. This repeated itself all semester and by the end of semester 1, I was burnt out and tired, happy but perhaps superficially.

I thought through this in semester 2 as well as in Year 2 Sem 1 and as I entered my second academic year I realised what a failure I’d been because I put God together with my to do list. Perhaps it was not that I did not prioritize Him, but that He was just another thing to tick off the list. In that sense it was as though if I could not finish the task, I could always push it to the next day or the day after. By His grace I repented of this in Year 2 and here are therefore some lessons I learnt.

  1. God is not part of your priority list, He should be independent of it

God should be ruling your to do list. How I arrange what I need to do for the day, week and month should be regulated by my attitude towards God. This means that we should allocate time to seek Him, quiet time in the mornings or nights, and not do it only when it is convenient for us to do so. If He really comes first, other things can wait.

  1. We are often stressed that we cannot finish everything we have to do.

That’s a problem I face all the time and still do. I figured somewhere along the way that the reason why I face this problem is because I never truly and fully believed that God is the God of the impossible. If I said He is Who He is then I should believe it – and that means to trust that if I go for that prayer meeting instead of allocating that two-hour slot to finish another 500 words of my essay, He will help me to complete it. I say this not meaning that we should leave our work to the last minute and expect Him to complete it for us, but that if perhaps practically, we are conflicted whether to go for a church meeting or do a piece of work instead, try putting Him first, try having faith in Him, and He promised He will be faithful and never fail us.

  1. Do all things not half-heartedly but with all that we have, not for ourselves, but for Him.

God tells us that He wants us to do everything we do with our whole heart. Whether it be relationships with people or academics, or any other task we sign up to do, we should not do it with a nonchalant attitude. This is because we are the living testimonies for Christ and for the Christian values (that we possibly claim to uphold). Furthermore, the way we carry ourselves with relation to work also is a way to share the gospel – the best proof is our lives and our attitude toward work. The Bible says we should do everything as unto God and not to men.

  1. Our standard should therefore be not men’s standard but God’s.

In a society where GPA/CAP/any form of academic grading seems to take the priority, determining our future and life, it is hard to look for anything outside that box. It is essential to always remind ourselves that we belong to Christ and that God is the ONLY one whose opinion matters. Ultimately, if we have done our best, we leave the result to God. At the same time, when failures come our way, it may be that God wants to teach us lessons through it and in a way, no one’s expectations and standards can impact and affect us to a really great extent because He is the most powerful God. We serve a God who controls all the world, do we believe that our grades and our lives are in His hand too? So, all the time, but especially when we feel that we are thrashed because we have not been able to live up to the expectations of the world, ourselves, family, anyone else for that matter, remember that it is God’s expectations and His favour and love toward us that count.

I hope that as Year 2 Sem 2 starts, I will remember these lessons and that we all together will become a blessing to someone else, to many others :’).

Studyblrs; what are they?

I started on this journey in Year 2 Sem 1 because truth be told, I was attracted to the aesthetic side of it. It was much later that I appreciated everything else alongside the aesthetic. I’ve always been a stationery and notebook hoarder and it is a pain for anyone who follows me to Muji to see me croon over the pens in all their varying colours and shades.

So here are some common questions when people hear about ‘Studyblr’s.

1. What is a studyblr?

You know this microblogging site Tumblr? Tumblr (currently owned by Yahoo) – is home to many communities of different interests – football (and the different clubs), Marvel, DC, Doctor Who, etc. So some of these communities incorporate the end of the word ‘Tumblr’ into their community. Studyblrs are therefore a combination of a community of people who love studying/learning/school and are on Tumblr – there you go, Study-blr!

2. Who are the people on Studyblr(s)?

There are all sorts of people on Tumblr who have blogs on studying and nice notes etc etc. The age ranges from high school to postgrad studies. The community is home to many who love studying – literally. We are (a little too) obsessed with making nice notes, bullet journaling (which will be discussed in another post), and sharing resources. People are generally very nice and welcoming and it is no surprise that the community has grown very fast. Personal style is very encouraged and people are often bouncing ideas off each other which creates a very diverse and yet original environment.

Screen Shot 2016-12-10 at 01.11.00.png

3. What’s so good about it?

A lot of things – there’s a community of people who understand you, the worries of 3am late nights and school problems, you get people who are amazing enough to create resources (we call them printables!) and others who create a collation of bases of resources (also known as #masterposts), you pick up languages and learn where and how to study them online, there’s 100++ different note taking styles which you can adapt as your own, tips and tricks on productivity, reminders to take breaks, be nice to yourself and not murder yourself studying, and so many more. It sets up a very nice place to be a student in and you learn from other people how to improve yourself academically and even otherwise. Best of all, you make new friends. Here are some screenshots.

screen-shot-2016-12-10-at-00-49-03

Just a screenshot of what you find when you google ‘masterpost studyblr’

screen-shot-2016-12-10-at-00-44-38

screen-shot-2016-12-10-at-01-24-34

here’s a screenshot of free printables from @theorganizedstudent

4. What do you need to do to be part of the community?

All you need, really, is to start a tumblog – and follow people – find people, search for ‘studyblr’ and follow according to your fancy. If you don’t know how to use Tumblr, it is simple. Go to tumblr.com, sign up and then follow the instructions onscreen. Maybe start with a first post introducing yourself and let people know what you do and what you’re interested in. Then go reblog some posts, like some posts that you fancy and maybe go talk to people very PM or comment on some posts. Slowly ease yourself into the community.

All it takes is to start with your first post. Then you’ll get in slowly.
The most important thing to note is that – your pictures and posts DO NOT have to be like everyone else’s. They may all look roughly similar – cup of coffee, notes, laptop, scattered stationery… but actually everyone has their style. I personally like to post pictures of nice word headings I did and stuff.

5. You’ll see certain common stationery that tends to pop up in more than a few posts, and they’re actually used by quite a few people because they’re good. Here’s a list,

  • Mildliners by Zebra
  • Muji plain pens – 0.38 and 0.5
  • Sharpies
  • Tombow Pentel Touch Sign Pen – it’s a brush pen if you like fancy header.

The point of studyblrs are to encourage good studying habits – taking nice notes, bullet journaling, good time management and more. You can always start today! 🙂

6. Recommend me blogs to follow!

Here are some:
http://theorganisedstudent.tumblr.com/
http://hexaneandheels.tumblr.com/
http://hermionegoals.tumblr.com/
http://studyshu.tumblr.com/

There are others but here are 3 starters.

Personally I have enjoyed the time in the community very much and I look forward to new studyblrs being set up and people introducing themselves. It’s very nice to see ideas being shared on such a platform and it’s a very positive thing to have students from all over the world collaborating and sharing ideas and motivating each other!
Here’s a shoutout to my Singapore studyblr friends – @literaturistic @motivatedmeepguin @studyshu

Enjoy yourself, and PM me if you have any questions or think I can help you in any way!
Also, visit my studyblr here 🙂

Credits: Most pictures are not mine, they belong to the rightful owners and creators on tumblr.

 

 

Week 9 // Reflections

Random quick post but I am very thankful for everything that has happened and is happening up to this week.

  1. For stamina to go on. University is madness sometimes I wonder how college students aren’t dead from lack of proper sleep, and overloading on caffeine. But we are. I am.
  2. For discipline. Thank God for this. For the ability to be on time, on task, to be fast and efficient.
  3. For good profs – who bear with my crappy consults and constant whining about this and that and for reading my outlines and answering my (useless) questions.
  4. For a circle (or circles should I say), of friends I can rely on. when I am down I know they are there I know I have people to rant to, I know I have people who would not just be there but pray with and for me, for people I know who love me more than I ever deserve, to always remind me of what I am as a person and tell me not to lose my identity in this world.
  5. For church, for those I meet weekly, who bring me back to focus on what my purpose of life is, to remind me of my niche in this world, of my passion and love for God, to remind me who I am as a Christian, that I am His and not anyone else’s. To remind me to be faithful and consecrated to Christ. Also, for my Christian friends, I am very thankful for all of you.
  6. For the chances and opportunities given to me – clubs, societies, organisations, sports. places to grow, mature and understand the world and my society deeper and with more perception and gain experience in interpersonal relationships and leadership skills.
  7. For every other gift that I overlook in my every day life, for money and food and everything that has created a comfortable enough life for me to enjoy studying, for mom to provide me with whatever I need despite her difficulties, for a sister to love and care.
  8. One more thing I’d thank God for – is the gift of rest. This semester I learnt how to rest. As a workaholic it’s very difficult to not work and do something even if it be mindless tasks. Thank God for grace to CHILL, sleep, relax and be okay with that and not be guilty or something.

It’s been a great semester, a challenging one mentally, physically and emotionally. But unless we’re challenged, we don’t grow.